Discover Gothenburg

A day can be spent in a thousand different ways when you are in Gothenburg. Relax in one of the green parks, take a walk and do some shopping at Avenyn or visit some of the many museums or activity centers.

In Slottsskogen and Trädgårdsföreningen you can relax with a good book or a picnic while. In Nordstan, at Kungsgatan or at NK is shopping for anyone who wants to spend time searching for the latest fashion garments or just try to look for the perfect party outfit. At the knowledge center Universeum and the amusement park Liseberg time really flies!

Visit the rainforest while the tram passes outside the window or take a look at exotic animals. Or why not try the steepest hills in one of the many rides at Liseberg?


10 things you need to know before you go.


Gothenburg is located on the west coast of Sweden – the far north coffee-loving country famous for elks, stylish design and Volvo cars. We have gathered some quirky facts, traditions and useful information.

1. BLACK COFFEE, PLEASE.

Sweden is one of the top 3 countries* in the world when it comes to coffee consumption. We even have a special word for taking a break to grab a coffee and something sweet –‘fika’. This is also a way to socialise with friends, much like a visit to the pub in the UK.

2. LAGOM – JUST THE RIGHT AMOUNT.

In Sweden the word lagom – just the right amount of something – is a state of mind as much as a word. It literally translates into something similar like ‘just right’ or ‘adequate’.

3. BE ON TIME AND WAIT IN LINE.

Swedes cherish orderliness and are always on time for an appointment. 10 o’clock means 10 sharp, not 10.30. Another sign of this is the organised queuing – either with a numbered ticket system or by lining up. Nevertheless, waiting in line is serious stuff.

4. FREEDOM TO ROAM

The Right of Public Access (Allemansrätten) gives everyone the right to roam the Swedish countryside – hiking, canoeing, mushroom picking and so on. The term ‘don’t disturb, don’t destroy’, is a good guideline on how to take extra care.

5. WATER STRAIGHT FROM THE TAP.

The water in the tap is safe and drinkable, so there is no need to purchase bottled water while in Sweden.



6. PURCHASING ALCOHOL

The only place that sells alcohol (expect for bars and restaurants) is the state monopoly Systembolaget. The stores close early on Saturdays and stay closed on Sundays. The legal age limit is 20 and make sure you bring an ID. (Beers and cider with less than 3,5 % alcohol can be purchased in regular grocery stores).

7. THE AVERAGE MEAL

Lunch deals are offered on weekdays between 11.00–14.00 or so and are often at around 65-95 SEK. An evening main course can start from around 100–150 SEK.

8. TIPPING AT DINNER.

Tipping is optional, but appreciated in restaurants. It’s common to add 5-10 per cent on the food bill or round up the amount. Taxi-drivers will appreciate a small tip too, but it’s normally not needed in hotel unless you receive extra-ordinary treatment.

9. SHOES OFF AT THE DOOR, PLEASE.

Are you visiting a Swedish home? Remember to take off your shoes at the door.

10. IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY.

Dial 112 in case of an emergency to reach ambulance, police or fire brigade. Everyone is entitled to emergency healthcare and EU citizens (with an EU insurance card) pay the same subsidised cost as Swedish residents. Non-EU residents pay full fees and should make sure they are covered by their health insurance while in Sweden.

*According to statistics from Euromonitor, 2013.

Sweden in numbers and fast facts

Source: Sweden.se.

  • 9,7 million inhabitants.
  • 1, 574 kilometres long from south to north.
  • Around 300,000–400,000 elks roam the Swedish forests.
  • Form of government: Constitutional monarchy, with parliamentary democracy.
  • National Day: 6 June
  • Biggest lake: Vänern.
  • Currency: SEK (Swedish krona/kronor)
  • Calling code: +46

All text from: goteborg.com


Summer


The Swedish summer is characterised by seemingly endless days and nights. The light evenings are something special not seen in many places outside Scandinavia. This is the perfect time of the year for staying out late to enjoy al fresco dining, music festivals and outdoor concerts. Don’t miss the chance to enjoy swimming in the clear waters off the coast and all other perks of the high season.

What would a local do?


Go on a day trip to the archipelago to enjoy picturesque car-free islands, beaches and boat rides. Also, again dine outside, be it a BBQ, picnic or restaurant. Swedes embrace summer to the max and most locals enjoy an annual vacation (four or even five weeks) between mid-June and mid-August.